Delta Waterways Clean Up Planned April 29

20150418_103423 (3)

Volunteers from 2015 having fun cleaning up Delta waterways. (Photo: Kathryn Kynett)

Be part of keeping the California Delta clean. The Delta Conservancy is organizing events on April 29 to clean up parts of the Delta waterways in coordination with Sacramento Area Creeks Council’s Creek Week.

(Photo credits: Aaron Haiman)

The cleanup events will take place from 9am to noon on the 29th of April. The Delta Conservancy will be leading three different sites including a new site in Suisun City. After the cleanup, there is a celebration at Carmichael Park from noon to 2pm.

Contact Aaron Haiman for more information: aaron.haiman@deltaconservancy.ca.gov. Ready to volunteer? Register online: http://creekweek.net/vdelta.html

 

More information about Sacramento County’s Creek Week: http://creekweek.net/

Advertisements

3 Reasons for Rail Trails in the California Delta

Let's repurpose rail infrastructure in the California Delta to provide recreation for all.

Let’s repurpose rail infrastructure in the California Delta to provide recreation for all.

Download the free PDF “A Cycling Adventure: Central Otago Rail Trail with Delta Feature” from http://www.onyourradarmediaco.com or from the side bar on this blog.

1. Rail trails are a cool way to repurpose retired rail lines or to repurpose ample easements associated with railroads. We as the public have already paid for the right of way. These rail lines are never very steep. They are popular for walking and cycling and great for people of all ages and fitness levels.

2. Rail trails can be engines for economic development. With AirBnB, it is easy to develop lodging in a region. Plus there are a large number of duck clubs who could offer places to stay for cyclists, as they did in Colusa County when the number of bird watchers started descending in late winter/early spring.

3. Rail trails provide a safe dedicated route for walkers and bikers to enjoy the Delta without crowding the existing two lane roads. Some residents of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, also known as the California Delta, complain about cyclists on the River Road. This will provide cyclists and walkers a place to safely enjoy these activities.

Download the free PDF and be sure to check out page 12.

AMGEN Tour of California Races in the Delta

The announced 2015 route of AMGEN Tour of California includes the Delta, and on the very first day–Stage One, Sunday May 10. The bike racers will depart from Sacramento, ride 124 miles along the Sacramento River to Rio Vista and back for a likely sprint finish in Sacramento.

AMGEN Tour of California

Sir Bradley Wiggins of Team Sky won the time trial in Folsom in 2014

The State Capitol will once again provide a dramatic backdrop to the race. Adding the route through the Delta will add some visual excitement and a good excuse to visit your favorite Delta community with a picnic and a bottle of wine and watch the peloton.

Waiting for the peloton on City of Sacramento curb.

Waiting for the peloton on City of Sacramento curb.

Stage Two on May 11 starts in Nevada City and ends in Lodi, California. Lodi is on the edge of the Delta and offers plenty of wine tasting and a celebratory finish. The song lyrics “stuck in Lodi” will not be running through these cyclists minds as they will be once again sprinting for the finish.

Creating cuisine from invasive species

One of the stressors to the ecosystem in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta are invasive species, introduced plants and animals that crowd out native species.  This problem is not unique to the Delta. Almost every part of the settled earth struggles with this because it is primarily people in their infinite wisdom who introduce these plants or animals. When I was in Portland I read how the local chefs participated in a challenge to create dishes using the invasive species found in the Columbia River.

Chinese mitten crab

Chinese mitten crab

I forgot about it until I recently read this story in Grist about a sushi chef in Connecticut who is using invasive species to replace diminishing bluefin tuna.

Could we do the same with Delta invasives?

Water hyacinth salad?

Mitten crab cakes?

Check out the complete list of invasive species in the Bay Delta Conservation Plan for more potential cuisine.

 

Photography on the Delta

Guest Blog by Bill Reid

Boat dock at Walnut Grove with bridge beyond

Boat dock at Walnut Grove with bridge beyond

Google Earth Walnut Grove, California and you can’t miss the dock to the north of the bridge where these pictures were taken. Everyone has Google Earth, right?  The stroller we recently bought for our future granddaughter has an iPad holder!

Joking aside, You don’t need an iPad or fancy SAT NAV to get to the River Road, just follow your nose south from the intersection of Broadway and Freeport Boulevard in Sacramento and enjoy the scenic route through the Sacramento River Delta. The scenic route is about 30.4 miles and 44 minutes on a relatively curvy levy road (state highway 160).  A faster route down Interstate 5 to Twin Cities Road is also a pleasant drive at 28.5 miles and 36 minutes.

The River Road south from Sacramento is one of my favorite local drives. I still remember one of the first times I drove it in an old VW convertible in the late seventies. No NAV then. Those were the days of typewriters and whiteout.

Walnut Grove Bridge taken from dock with sun setting behind.

Walnut Grove Bridge taken from dock with sun setting behind.

One morning early in the new year, I decided to take photographs of the sun rising over the River for a website I’m building. I left a little too late and missed the best light so returned later in the day for some sunset shots.

Walnut Grove is a pleasant stop along the Sacramento River.  There is ample parking and a selection of restaurants with tables outdoors, even an art gallery or two. I enjoyed an ice cream while waiting for the sun to set.

The boat dock is accessible to the public although children must wear life jackets. There is a lift for handicap access and there is a portable toilet. The boat dock affords a good vantage point for photography with ample space for tripods and equipment.

I have returned a few times since to test different equipment and media. In the age of tablets, digital cameras and smart phones, I am going back to using film, but that’s another story. The light is different on each occasion and the sunsets can be spectacular as the weather changes.

Bill is an architect by day.  He lives in Sacramento with his wife, Claudia.  His images can be purchased on his website:  www.breid.photoshelter.com